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MOVEMENT IMPAIRMENTS IN FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT

20th December 2013


Movement impairments associated with femoroactetabular impingment are receiving more attention. Uncontrolled posterior rotation of the pelvis is often observed - nice to see a paper exploring the kinematics of the hip and pelvis on hip flexion


The pelvifemoral rhythm in cam-type femoroacetabular impingement. Van Houcke J, Pattyn C, Vanden Bossche L, Redant C, Maes JW, Audenaert EA.

Clinical Biomechanics 29 (2014) 63-67

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is growing evidence that femoroacetabular impingement is a potentially important risk factor for the development of early idiopathic osteoarthritis in the nondysplastic hip. Understanding of affected joint kinematics is a basic prerequisite in the evaluation of mechanical disorders in a clinical and research oriented setting. The aim of the present study was to compare pelvifemoral kinematics between subjects diagnosed with femoroacetabular impingement and healthy controls.

METHODS:

The authors collected motion data of the femur and pelvis on a total of 43 hips - 19 cam impingement hips and 24 healthy controls - using a validated electromagnetic tracking device. The pelvifemoral rhythm in supine position was defined during both active and passive hip flexion and statistically compared between both groups.

FINDINGS:

A significant increase in posterior pelvic rotation was observed during active hip flexion in the femoroacetabular impingement group compared with the control group (P<0.001). During passive hip flexion, however, posterior pelvic rotation between the impingement group and the controls did not differ significantly (P=0.628).

INTERPRETATION:

Posterior pelvic rotation during active high-end hip flexion is increased in femoroacetabular impingement, indicating the presence of an active compensational mechanism that decreases the extent of harmful joint conflict during high-flexion activities.

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